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Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world after water –– and from sugary Turkish Rize tea to salty Tibetan butter tea, there are almost as many ways of preparing the beverage as there are cultures on the globe. Where did this beverage originate, and how did it become so popular? Shunan Teng details tea’s long history.
Did you know that many different types of tea come from the same plant? It’s pretty amazing, considering the various flavors and colors, but what really sets each tea apart are the chemical changes that happen in the leaves during production. This week on Reactions, we’re going to debunk a couple of myths behind the healthful and flavorful compounds found in each type of tea.
Welcome to the world of a national obsession and a place where people say 'orf' instead of 'off'. Tea connoisseurs will benefit from the six golden tips for making the perfect cuppa, as well as countless other handy hints (never store your tea next to cheese, for example). There's an assessment of the pros and cons of various teapots and words of wisdom about the tea bush itself. Slightly grotesque methods for producing tea en masse are demonstrated - it was wartime, after all - and tea had to be produced by the oceanful. As such, there are some top tips for cleaning that hard-to-reach tap in your tea urn. Remember: "a dirty tap means dirty tea". See more public information films free on BFI Player (UK only).
The kettle's on! Join Anglophenia's Kate Arnell for tea as she explains how to make a perfect cuppa the British way.
Fire up your kettles—we’re going around the world in seven cups of tea. Great Big Story senior producer Beryl Shereshewsky checks in with seven people in seven different countries who show us how they prepare their perfect cuppa. We sample all of it—from Japan’s matcha to Argentina’s mate. Even if you’re a coffee drinker, we’re certain you’ll want to reach for a tea bag after you’re steeped in all this knowledge.